Arminian Today

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Posts Tagged ‘The Virgin Mary

The Importance of the Virgin Birth (Part Two)

In my previous post, I posted on why the virgin birth of Christ matters.  The sign of Isaiah 7:14 was that Immanuel would come through the virgin.  Jesus is called Immanuel in Matthew 1:23 which Matthew gives as a direct prophetic fulfillment of Isaiah 7:14.  Jesus is God with us.  Jesus was both fully God and fully man (John 1:1, 14).  Paul the Apostle would later write in 1 Timothy 3:16:

Great indeed, we confess, is the mystery of godliness:

He was manifested in the flesh,
vindicated by the Spirit,
seen by angels,
proclaimed among the nations,
believed on in the world,
taken up in glory.

The question is who was manifested in the flesh?  Obviously it is God who was manifested in the flesh.  In fact, the NKJV has God as manifested in the flesh.  Jesus was God manifested in the flesh.  Christmas speaks of the incarnation of God.  At Resurrection Sunday, the Church celebrates the fact of Jesus’ bodily resurrection from the dead (1 Corinthians 15:20).  When the Church celebrates the Lord’s Supper we celebrate Jesus’ death, resurrection and His coming again (1 Corinthians 11:26).  But there could be no resurrection without an incarnation.

The birth of Jesus demonstrates that it was fully God who was coming into the world.  Albert Barnes writes about this wonderful event of Matthew 1:22-23:

This is a Hebrew word, and means, literally, God with us. Matthew doubtless understands this word as denoting that the Messiah was really “God with us,” or that the Divine nature was united to the human. He does not affirm that this was its meaning when used in reference to the child to whom it was first applied; but this was its meaning as applicable to the Messiah. It was fitly expressive of his character; and in this sense it was fulfilled. When first used by Isaiah, it denoted simply that the birth—of the child was a sign that God was with the Jews, to deliver them. The Hebrews often used the name of Jehovah, or God, in their proper names. Thus, Isaiah means “the salvation of Jehovah;” Eleazer, “help of God;” Eli, “my God,” etc. But Matthew evidently intends more than was denoted by the simple use of such names. He had just given an account of his miraculous conception; of his being begotten by the Holy Ghost. God was therefore his Father. He was Divine as well as human. His appropriate name was “God with us.” And though the mere use of such a name would not prove that he had a Divine nature, yet, as Matthew uses it, and meant evidently to apply it, it does prove that Jesus was more than a man; that he was God as well as man. And it is this which gives glory to the plan of redemption. It is this which is the wonder of angels. It is this which makes the plan so vast, so grand, so full of instruction and comfort to Christians. See Php 2:6-8. It is this which sheds such peace and joy into the sinner’s heart; which gives him such security of salvation; and renders the condescension of God in redemption so great, and his character so lovely.

Barnes then gives us a poem about the beauty of Immanuel:

“Till God in human flesh I see,
My thoughts no comfort find;
The holy, just, and sacred Three,
Are terror to my mind.

“But if IMMANUEL’S face appears,
My hope, my joy, begins;
His grace removes my slavish fears,
His blood removes my sins.”

Immanuel has come to bring peace for men before God.  The angel proclaimed in Luke 2:14 to the shepherds at Jesus’ birth (NKJV):

“Glory to God in the highest,
And on earth peace, goodwill toward men!”

Ephesians 2:14 says that He would bring peace between the Jews and Gentiles and bring us together as one people under His Lordship.  Micah 5:5 records that the Messiah to be born in Bethlehem (v.2) would be our peace.  Romans 5:1 says that we have peace with God through the Lord Jesus Christ.  He is our peace!

His birth demonstrates the fact that this birth through Mary was not about Mary.  The Catholics have placed too much emphasis on Mary even going so far as to teach that she herself was born of a virgin (the immaculate conception).  Yet both Matthew and Luke place the emphasis on the Lord Jesus and rightfully so.  The Christmas story is about God becoming a man.  Is not about the virgin.  The virgin’s role (as important as it was) is insignificant to the birth of the Messiah.  This birth shows that Jesus is fully God.  This Child born of Mary was conceived by the supernatural power of God (Luke 1:35) yet the birth of the Messiah is so incredible that even the angel Gabriel had to say that “nothing will be impossible with God” (Luke 1:37).  That a virgin gave birth is incredible in of itself.  The virgin birth has driven liberal theologians mad for many years.  How could a virgin give birth to the Messiah?  And yet Scripture says that it happened and so it did.

Without a doubt the message that Christmas shouts to us is that God became flesh.  Christmas has nothing to do with Santa Claus or with Christmas trees or lights or snow or singing festive songs.  Christmas has nothing to do with giving and receiving gifts.  Christmas has everything to do with the incarnation of God.  This is what the world ignores in favor of elves for if God truly became a man and He lived among us, He will judge the world again in perfect righteousness (Acts 17:30-31; Hebrews 9:27-28).

As a disciple of Jesus, I rejoice that He became flesh.  I rejoice that He was tempted in all ways as I am yet without sin (Hebrews 4:15) and I rejoice that He lived a perfect life and died for my sins (2 Corinthians 5:21).  I rejoice that He is risen from the dead (Luke 24:36-43) and that He now sits at the right hand of God praying for me (Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25).  I rejoice that Jesus is coming again (Acts 1:11).  I pray that He comes soon (Revelation 22:20).

Written by The Seeking Disciple

12/19/2013 at 3:19 PM

The Wonder of the Christmas Story

I can still remember how my salvation brought Christmas back to my heart again.  After I found out there was no Santa Claus at the age of about 7 or 8, Christmas lost much of its wonder.  I still looked forward to getting presents but the wonder was gone.  The lights, the magic, the wonder of it all was not the same once I saw that my dad was Santa and had been for all those years.  It wasn’t until I was born again at the age of 17 that Christmas became a true joy to me again as I begin to study the importance of the incarnation of God.

Too often what gets lost in the Christmas season is the wonder of the incarnation.  I have been a disciple of Jesus now for nearly 20 years and yet every Christmas I go back to read Matthew 1 and Luke 1-2 and the many prophetic scriptures concerning the incarnation of our Lord and I never cease to step away from the pages of the Bible and simply say, “God You are amazing to me.  Your ways cause me to stand in awe of You and Your wisdom.”  How is it that the very God who created all things in Genesis 1-2 can now stoop down and become a tiny baby inside the womb of the virgin Mary?  How is it that the very God who told David, “Heaven is my throne and the earth is My footstool” could now become a baby who would be totally dependent upon His earthly mother?  How is it that the God who was so holy and pure that no eyes could even behold Him in His glory would now take on flesh and blood for all to see Him?  The God who raises up kings and puts down kings would now be in the care of a young girl and young man for His needs.

The incarnation is beyond me.  It’s not that I don’t get it theologically.  It’s that I still am amazed that the Word became flesh (John 1:14).  I am amazed that God came down to us (Isaiah 9:6-7).  I stand in awe of the grace of God to allow His perfect Son to come to die for my sins (2 Corinthians 5:21).  I am in awe of God’s great love for me (John 3:16).  I am amazed at the faith of Mary (Luke 1:38).  I am amazed at the faith and trust of Joseph (Matthew 1:20-25; 2:12).  I am amazed at the proclamation by the angel Gabriel where he seems to simply stand in awe of God by saying, after telling Mary how she will conceive the Christ-child, that “nothing will be impossible for God” (Luke 1:37) almost as if to say, “I don’t understand the ways of God but I know that He can do whatever He likes.”  I stand in awe of the miracle called Christmas.

And that has restored my joy.  That has renewed my passion for Christmas.  I don’t enjoy the presents like I did when I was younger.  I get frustrated with the commercialism that has become Christmas.  I grow weary with the Christmas songs on the radio all the time.  But I love the incarnation.  I love the story of Jesus’ wonderful birth.  I love that He came to save this sinner and to do so, He became just like I am but without sin (1 Peter 2:21-24).  Jesus, the perfect Son of God, the Lamb of God (John 1:29), came down and humble Himself to the cross (Philippians 2:5-11).  The incarnation keeps me realizing that God loves me and that He desires to save me and clothe me in His righteousness (Romans 3:21-25).

Praise God for Christmas!

Written by The Seeking Disciple

12/01/2011 at 10:00 AM

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