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Posts Tagged ‘Protestant Reformation

I’m Reformed

What does Reformed mean?  According to dictionary.reference.com it means:

amended by removal of faults, abuses, etc.

Calvinists often use the term for their branch of theology.  Reformed theology.  The idea is to focus the person back to the Reformation.  In this way, Calvinists often perceive themselves as not just children of the Protestant Reformation but in fact they see themselves as the protectors of the Reformation.  Of course, Lutherans would disagree as would many other Protestants including Arminians.

Arminius was a Reformer.  His theology was clearly Protestant.  Arminius had no love for the Roman Catholic Church despite some who want to believe that Arminius was a secret Catholic or at least he shared sympathy for their theology.  This is clearly not the case.  Arminius differed with Catholicism in many ways especially in the area of justification.  Here Arminius aligned himself clearly with the Protestants as he wrote:

From the premises thus laid down according to the Scriptures, we conclude, that justification, when used for the act of a Judge, is either purely the imputation of righteousness through mercy from the throne of grace in Christ the propitiation made to a sinner, but who is a believer; (Rom. i, 16, 17; Gal. iii, 6, 7;) or that man is justified before God, of debt, according to the rigor of justice without any forgiveness. (Rom. 3, 4.) Because the Papists deny the latter, they ought to concede the former. And this is such a truth, that, how high soever may be the endowments of any one of the Saints in faith, hope and charity, and however numerous and excellent the works of faith, hope and charity may be which he has performed, he will receive no sentence of justification from God the Judge, unless He quit the tribunal of his severe justice and ascend the throne of grace, and from it pronounce a sentence of absolution in his favour, and unless the Lord of his mercy and pity graciously account for righteousness the whole of that good with which the saint appears before Him. For, woe to a life of the utmost innocency, if it be judged without mercy. (Psalm xxxii, 1, 2, 5, 6; cxliii, 2; 1 John i, 7-10; 1 Cor. iv, 4.) This is a confession which even the Papists seem to make when they assert, that the works of the Saints cannot stand before the judgment of God unless they be sprinkled with the blood of Christ.

Arminius loved the catholic church but by this he meant the universal church.  He writes again:

The catholic church is the company of all believers, called out from every language, tribe, people, nation and calling, who have been, are now, and will be, called by the saving vocation of God from a state of corruption to the dignity of the children of God, through the word of the covenant of grace, and engrafted into Christ, as living members to their head through true faith, to the praise of the glory of the grace of God. From this, it appears that the catholic church differs from particular churches in nothing which appertains to the substance of a church, but solely in her amplitude.

And how does one get into this catholic church?  Arminius answers:

The efficient cause of the church, that both produces her by regeneration and preserves her by daily education, and that perfects her by an immediate union of her to himself, is God the Father, in his well beloved Son Jesus Christ, by the Spirit of Christ who is the Redeemer and the Head of the church. (2 Tim. i, 9; 1 Pet. i, 12.) We view the gospel as the instrument, that is, “the incorruptible seed by which the church is born again.” (1 Pet. i, 23, 25.)

When it comes to Arminius’ disagreements with the Calvinists of his day (and bear in mind that Arminius was a student of Reformed theology having studied under Beza in Geneva and was assigned by the Calvinists of his day to debate the Anabaptists), Arminius differed over the issue of creeds.  Arminius believed that creeds and councils and catechisms can err.  He wrote:

The authority of councils is not absolute, but dependent on the authority of God; for this reason, no one is simply bound to assent to those things which have been decreed in a council, unless those persons be present, as members, who cannot err, and who have the undoubted marks and testimonies of the Holy Spirit to this fact. But every one may, nay, he is bound, to examine, by the word of God, those things which have been concluded in the council; and if he finds them to be agreeable to the divine word, then he may approve of them; but if they are not, then he may express his disapprobation. Yet he must be cautious not easily to reject that which has been determined by the unanimous consent of so many pious and learned men; but he ought diligently to consider, whether it has the Scriptures pronouncing in favour of it with sufficient clearness; and when this is the case, he may yield his assent, in the Lord, to their unanimous agreement.

The cry of the Reformation had been: “Reformed and always reforming.”  The Reformation students understood that the church might err yet again as the Roman Catholics had erred.  Arminius understood this point, writing:

It is also allowable for a later ecumenical or general council to call in doubt that which had been decreed by a preceding general council, because it is possible even for general councils to err; nor yet does it follow from these premises that the catholic church errs; that is, that all the faithful universally err.

Apostasy can come to even the best of people.  Why?  Because they are humans (Romans 3:10-18).  People often make mistakes.  This is why Reformation is needed.  There is no denying that the Lord will always have His faithful bride (2 Timothy 2:19).  I see nothing in Scripture to suggest a complete apostasy from the faith but people do err.  We must be careful to examine all things by the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 5:21).  We are called to test the spirits (1 John 4:1) and this only happens when we take the inerrant and infallible Word of God and test all teachings.

In this sense, I am Reformed.  I am not a Calvinist but I believe that the disciple of Jesus often needs reforming.  Our minds can wander.  Our hearts can grow cold (Revelation 2:4). We can become worldly minded.  The disciple should strive to know God and know His Word (John 17:3; Romans 12:1-2).  The disciple should be willing to allow the Holy Spirit to reform us not just in our theology but in our hearts and actions.  We are new creations in Christ Jesus (2 Corinthians 5:17) let us then live like it (Ephesians 4:17-24; 5:8-21).  The Holy Spirit is always desiring to reform us and make us more like Christ.

Arminius desired this as well.  He desired the church to always be reforming.  We must not grow satisfied with merely having sound doctrine.  We must not be satisfied with merely saying we are not Roman Catholics.  We must go hard after Jesus.  We should strive to love Him more and more, to worship Him who sits on the throne.  We should hunger and thirst for righteousness (Matthew 5:6) knowing that our satisfaction will be found in Jesus our head.

My prayer is to be more like Jesus.  I am so tired of me.  I am tired of trying to reform my ways when my heart is the issue.  I pray that the Lord Jesus will be glorified through me and that He would be Lord of my life completely in every way.  I want to exalt Jesus and not myself.  I want to see Jesus glorified among His saints.

Grant this all Lord Jesus!

Standing for the Reformation

What would it take for Christians to accept Roman Catholics as part of the fold?  What doctrines must the Roman Catholic Church denounce for us to accept them as true disciples of Jesus?  I have a few things I would love to see the Roman Catholic Church renounce to become part of the true Church of the living God.

1.  Denounce the Catholic Rejection of Sola Scriptura.

The Catholic Church must accept the Bible as the inerrant and infallible Word of God for me to accept them as true disciples.

2.  Denounce the Catholic Approval of the Apocrypha.

The Roman Catholic Church must accept the 66 Books of the Biblical canon for me to accept them as true disciples.

3.  Denounce Good Works As Meritorious Before God.

Salvation is the work of God (John 1:12-13) and does not come by the works of men (Ephesians 2:8-9).  Good works flow from our salvation and not for our salvation (Isaiah 64:6; John 6:29; Acts 13:38-39; 15:11; Romans 4:5; Ephesians 2:10; Titus 2:11-14; James 2:14-26).

4.  Denounce the Authority of the Pope and His Office.

Arminius called the pope the antichrist (1 John 2:18).  All the Reformers viewed the pope as the antichrist.  The popery is unbiblical and does not have any authority from God nor from the Apostles.

5.  Denounce Praying to the Saints.

The true disciple has one mediator before God and that is the perfect Son of God (1 Timothy 2:5-6; Hebrews 4:14-16; 1 John 2:1-2).  We have no need for prayer to dead saints.

6.  Denounce Sainthood and Embrace the Priesthood of the Believers.

We are all saints in Christ Jesus (1 Corinthians 1:2).  We are all priests unto God through the Lord Jesus Christ (1 Peter 2:4-5; Revelation 1:6).

7.  Denounce That Salvation Comes By Any Means Other than Christ Jesus.

This is the principle of Christ alone.  We are not saved by being a member of an organization but by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ (Galatians 3:26-27).  Jesus alone saves by His own grace and mercy (1 Corinthians 1:30-31).  We are saved by the precious blood of Christ alone (1 Peter 1:18-19).

8.  Denounce the Teaching that Priests Can Forgive Sins.

Only God can forgive sins (Mark 2:6-11).  See also Isaiah 43:25.  James 5:16 does tell us to confess our sins to one another (not to a priest) but the text does not say that people give forgiveness for only God can (1 John 1:9).

9.  Denounce the Teaching Concerning the Virgin Mary.

The idea that Mary was born a virgin (the immaculate conception) and remained a virgin has no biblical basis.  Further, Mary is never painted as a co-redeemer with Christ.  Mary needed salvation just as we all have (Luke 1:47).  Mary went on to have other children by normal means (Matthew 1:25; Luke 8:20).  No where in the Bible are we taught that Mary was a perpetual virgin nor does it teach that she is someone who we can pray to.

10.  Embrace and Preach that Jesus Christ Alone Saves By His Grace Through Faith.

The Roman Catholic Church must preach that we are saved by Christ alone, by His grace alone, through faith alone.  We are not saved by what we do but by what Jesus has already done (John 19:30).  The work of salvation is finished.  Jesus has done all we need for salvation (Romans 3:22-25).  We are justified before God by faith (Romans 5:1).  We are not saved by our baptism in the church or our confirmation in the church. We are saved by the work of Christ and we look to Him alone to save us from our sins (1 Corinthians 15:1-4; Galatians 1:4; Ephesians 1:7; 2:8-9).  Our salvation is always based on the work of Jesus (John 14:6).

11.  Denounce the Teaching of Purgatory.  

We must be saved in this life (Hebrews 9:22, 27-28).  We are not saved after we die.  We are not sanctified by the fires of purgatory.  The Bible says that we are sanctified in Christ Jesus (Hebrews 10:10, 14).  Our eternal salvation is the finished work of Christ alone (Hebrews 7:22-28; 10:12).

12.  Denounce the Unbiblical Leadership Model of the Catholic Church.

This would include the pope but also the cardinals and the bishops.  1 Peter 5:1-4 teaches us that elders are to be our leaders by their example that comes from following the example of Jesus Christ our true shepherd (John 13:1-20).

13.  Acknowledge that Jesus Christ Alone is the Head of the Church.

This goes back to the popery.  Jesus Christ is the head of His Church (Matthew 16:18; Colossians 1:15-20).  Let us embrace Jesus alone as the One who is leading His people by His Word (John 8:47; 10:27-29).

Conclusion

I am sure some of you could write much more.  Let us all pray that Catholics repent and turn to Christ alone for salvation (Acts 4:12; Romans 10:9-10).  Christ alone is the only one who can bring us peace with a holy God (Romans 5:8-9).  Let us pray for the Reformation to still make an impact on Rome to call it to repentance and back to the Bible as the inerrant and infallible Word of God (2 Timothy 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:16-21).

Written by The Seeking Disciple

11/01/2014 at 11:11 AM

Happy Reformation Day!

Happy Reformation Day!  On this day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed his 95 Thesis to the church door in Wittenberg in Germany and launched the Protestant Reformation.  As Arminians, we are children of the Reformation!  Arminius comes from a long line of great Reformers in the Church including Luther, Calvin, Tyndale, Knox, and many others.

I pray to God that He raises up more reformers who call the Church back to the Word of God and to the true doctrine of salvation through faith in Jesus Christ alone.

Written by The Seeking Disciple

10/31/2014 at 10:00 AM

The Levites: Picture of the NT Saints (Part Two)

In my previous post on the Levites, I noted the promises that God gave to them about Him being their lot, Him being their portion.  God Himself said that the Levites were to be consecrated unto Him (Numbers 3:11-13).  The Lord told the children of Israel that the Levites were to be His priests to approach Him on their behalf (Numbers 3:5-10).

Deuteronomy 18:1-2 was clear about the Levites and the Lord being their portion:

“The Levitical priests, all the tribe of Levi, shall have no portion or inheritance with Israel. They shall eat the Lord’s food offerings as their inheritance. 2 They shall have no inheritance among their brothers; the Lord is their inheritance, as he promised them.

When the children of Israel finally entered into the promise land, the Levites did not inherit the land as God would again be their portion.  Joshua 13:14 reads,

To the tribe of Levi alone Moses gave no inheritance. The offerings by fire to the Lord God of Israel are their inheritance, as he said to him.

How does this picture the NT saint?

First, we are chosen in Christ Jesus (Ephesians 1:3-14).  Those who are in Christ Jesus by faith are His elect (1 Timothy 4:10).

Secondly, in Christ we are all priests before God.  1 Peter 2:9 reads,

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.

Notice that the disciple of Jesus is a royal priesthood.  All disciples are priests unto God in Christ Jesus (Revelation 1:6).  Through Christ we are all equally able to come into God’s presence because of the work of Christ, our faithful High Priest (Hebrews 4:14-16).  As Hebrews 13:15 reminds us:

Through him then let us continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that acknowledge his name.

Thirdly, there no longer remains a special group of people who do the priestly duties.  The Roman Catholic Church incorrectly carried over both the Levitical priesthood and combined it with paganism.  The Protestant Reformers did not go further enough to not just preach salvation through faith in Christ Jesus alone but they failed to dethrone men from the pope’s chair.  In exchange for one pope, the Protestants, in some ways, now have thousands.  The modern clergy-laity system does not find its roots in the New Testament but in the Old Testament with the Levites and with the Roman Catholics.

We need to see that our faithful high priest is Jesus and He is also our faithful pastor (John 10:11).  While the Church does have leaders, Jesus is the chief shepherd (1 Peter 5:4) and He is our shepherd and guardian of our souls (1 Peter 2:25).  Leaders are not there to rule over the people of God but to serve alongside them (Ephesians 4:11-16; 1 Peter 5:1-4).  There is not one NT example of one man leading one church.  There are always elders leading (Acts 20:17; Titus 1:5) but not one elder.  Furthermore, there is never named one pastor.  Ironically, what is amazing in the NT letters is the lack of leadership as compared to the modern clergy-laity driven church model.  Only Philippians (1:1) mentions leaders at the start of the letter.  Only Philippians.

I am not advocating no leadership.  Jesus said we would have leaders but His example was one of servant leaders and not worldly leaders (Matthew 20:20-28; John 13:1-20).  We are to imitate our leaders (Hebrews 13:7) and their example is Jesus and not a worldly CEO.  We are to submit to such leaders (Hebrews 13:17 and notice the emphasis on plurality).

My point here is that clergy do not have special access to God.  Clergy may know more about the Bible only because of their training but this doesn’t have to be the case nor should be the rule.  All of us are equal at the cross (Galatians 3:26-29).  We have different gifts and roles but we all are able to come boldly before the Lord because of Christ.  Christ has fulfilled the Law and the old types is now complete in Him (Hebrews 10:1-4).  We have a new covenant in Christ Jesus (Hebrews 8:13).  This new covenant enables all of God’s people to come before Him now through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ.  We don’t need a priest or a special place to worship God (nor even a special day as opposed to Sabbath keepers).  We can now worship, adore, praise, proclaim, and exalt the one true God at any time and any place.  He will never leave us nor forsake us for He is our portion and our delight.

The Council of Trent on Justification

The following is taken from the Council of Trent held in 1547 by the Roman Catholic Church and was a response to the Protestant Reformation.  Here are what they said about the doctrine of justification by faith.  Notice the wording and notice their rejection of justification by faith alone in Christ alone.

This is why we Arminians are Protestants!

ON JUSTIFICATION

CANON I.-If any one saith, that man may be justified before God by his own works, whether done through the teaching of human nature, or that of the law, without the grace of God through Jesus Christ; let him be anathema.

CANON II.-If any one saith, that the grace of God, through Jesus Christ, is given only for this, that man may be able more easily to live justly, and to merit eternal life, as if, by free will without grace, he were able to do both, though hardly indeed and with difficulty; let him be anathema.

CANON III.-If any one saith, that without the prevenient inspiration of the Holy Ghost, and without his help, man can believe, hope, love, or be penitent as he ought, so as that the grace of Justification may be bestowed upon him; let him be anathema.

CANON IV.-If any one saith, that man’s free will moved and excited by God, by assenting to God exciting and calling, nowise co-operates towards disposing and preparing itself for obtaining the grace of Justification; that it cannot refuse its consent, if it would, but that, as something inanimate, it does nothing whatever and is merely passive; let him be anathema.

CANON V.-If any one saith, that, since Adam’s sin, the free will of man is lost and extinguished; or, that it is a thing with only a name, yea a name without a reality, a figment, in fine, introduced into the Church by Satan; let him be anathema.

CANON VI.-If any one saith, that it is not in man’s power to make his ways evil, but that the works that are evil God worketh as well as those that are good, not permissively only, but properly, and of Himself, in such wise that the treason of Judas is no less His own proper work than the vocation of Paul; let him be anathema.

CANON VII.-If any one saith, that all works done before Justification, in whatsoever way they be done, are truly sins, or merit the hatred of God; or that the more earnestly one strives to dispose himself for grace, the more grievously he sins: let him be anathema.

CANON VIII.-If any one saith, that the fear of hell, whereby, by grieving for our sins, we flee unto the mercy of God, or refrain from sinning, is a sin, or makes sinners worse; let him be anathema.

CANON IX.-If any one saith, that by faith alone the impious is justified; in such wise as to mean, that nothing else is required to co-operate in order to the obtaining the grace of Justification, and that it is not in any way necessary, that he be prepared and disposed by the movement of his own will; let him be anathema.

CANON X.-If any one saith, that men are just without the justice of Christ, whereby He merited for us to be justified; or that it is by that justice itself that they are formally just; let him be anathema.

CANON XI.-If any one saith, that men are justified, either by the sole imputation of the justice of Christ, or by the sole remission of sins, to the exclusion of the grace and the charity which is poured forth in their hearts by the Holy Ghost, and is inherent in them; or even that the grace, whereby we are justified, is only the favour of God; let him be anathema.

CANON XII.-If any one saith, that justifying faith is nothing else but confidence in the divine mercy which remits sins for Christ’s sake; or, that this confidence alone is that whereby we are justified; let him be anathema.

CANON XIII.-If any one saith, that it is necessary for every one, for the obtaining the remission of sins, that he believe for certain, and without any wavering arising from his own infirmity and disposition, that his sins are forgiven him; let him be anathema.

CANON XIV.-If any one saith, that man is truly absolved from his sins and justified, because that he assuredly believed himself absolved and justified; or, that no one is truly justified but he who believes himself justified; and that, by this faith alone, absolution and justification are effected; let him be anathema.

CANON XV.-If any one saith, that a man, who is born again and justified, is bound of faith to believe that he is assuredly in the number of the predestinate; let him be anathema.

CANON XVI.-If any one saith, that he will for certain, of an absolute and infallible certainty, have that great gift of perseverance unto the end, unless he have learned this by special revelation; let him be anathema.

CANON XVII.-If any one saith, that the grace of Justification is only attained to by those who are predestined unto life; but that all others who are called, are called indeed, but receive not grace, as being, by the divine power, predestined unto evil; let him be anathema.

CANON XVIII.-If any one saith, that the commandments of God are, even for one that is justified and constituted in grace, impossible to keep; let him be anathema.

CANON XIX.-If any one saith, that nothing besides faith is commanded in the Gospel; that other things are indifferent, neither commanded nor prohibited, but free; or, that the ten commandments nowise appertain to Christians; let him be anathema.

CANON XX.-If any one saith, that the man who is justified and how perfect soever, is not bound to observe the commandments of God and of the Church, but only to believe; as if indeed the Gospel were a bare and absolute promise of eternal life, without the condition of observing the commandments ; let him be anathema.

CANON XXI.-If any one saith, that Christ Jesus was given of God to men, as a redeemer in whom to trust, and not also as a legislator whom to obey; let him be anathema.

CANON XXII.-If any one saith, that the justified, either is able to persevere, without the special help of God, in the justice received; or that, with that help, he is not able; let him be anathema.

CANON XXIII.-lf any one saith, that a man once justified can sin no more, nor lose grace, and that therefore he that falls and sins was never truly justified; or, on the other hand, that he is able, during his whole life, to avoid all sins, even those that are venial, except by a special privilege from God, as the Church holds in regard of the Blessed Virgin; let him be anathema.

CANON XXIV.-If any one saith, that the justice received is not preserved and also increased before God through good works; but that the said works are merely the fruits and signs of Justification obtained, but not a cause of the increase thereof; let him be anathema.

CANON XXV.-If any one saith, that, in every good work, the just sins venially at least, or-which is more intolerable still-mortally, and consequently deserves eternal punishments; and that for this cause only he is not damned, that God does not impute those works unto damnation; let him be anathema.

CANON XXVI.-If any one saith, that the just ought not, for their good works done in God, to expect and hope for an eternal recompense from God, through His mercy and the merit of Jesus Christ, if so be that they persevere to the end in well-doing and in keeping the divine commandments; let him be anathema.

CANON XXVII.-If any one saith, that there is no mortal sin but that of infidelity; or, that grace once received is not lost by any other sin, however grievous and enormous, save by that of infidelity ; let him be anathema.

CANON XXVIII.-If any one saith, that, grace being lost through sin, faith also is always lost with it; or, that the faith which remains, though it be not a lively faith, is not a true faith; or, that he, who has faith without charity, is not a Chris taught; let him be anathema.

CANON XXIX.-If any one saith, that he, who has fallen after baptism, is not able by the grace of God to rise again; or, that he is able indeed to recover the justice which he has lost, but by faith alone without the sacrament of Penance, contrary to what the holy Roman and universal Church -instructed by Christ and his Apostles -has hitherto professed, observed, and taught; let him be anathema.

CANON XXX.-If any one saith, that, after the grace of Justification has been received, to every penitent sinner the guilt is remitted, and the debt of eternal punishment is blotted out in such wise, that there remains not any debt of temporal punishment to be discharged either in this world, or in the next in Purgatory, before the entrance to the kingdom of heaven can be opened (to him); let him be anathema.

CANON XXXI.-If any one saith, that the justified sins when he performs good works with a view to an eternal recompense; let him be anathema.

CANON XXXII.-If any one saith, that the good works of one that is justified are in such manner the gifts of God, as that they are not also the good merits of him that is justified; or, that the said justified, by the good works which he performs through the grace of God and the merit of Jesus Christ, whose living member he is, does not truly merit increase of grace, eternal life, and the attainment of that eternal life, if so be, however, that he depart in grace, and also an increase of glory; let him be anathema.

CANON XXXIII.-If any one saith, that, by the Catholic doctrine touching Justification, by this holy Synod inset forth in this present decree, the glory of God, or the merits of our Lord Jesus Christ are in any way derogated from, and not rather that the truth of our faith, and the glory in fine of God and of Jesus Christ are rendered (more) illustrious; let him be anathema.

Let me be anathema then.  Let me fall upon the grace of Christ (Acts 15:11).

Written by The Seeking Disciple

03/13/2013 at 5:00 PM

Arminians and the Heart of the Reformation

The heart of the Reformation can be summed up in the five solae.  The five solae are five Latin statements regarding the Protestant view of theology.  They are:

  • Sola Scriptura (“by Scripture alone”)
  • Sola Fide (“by faith alone”)
  • Sola Gratia (“by grace alone”)
  • Solus Christus (“through Christ alone”)
  • Soli Deo Gloria (“glory to God alone”)

All five points of the solae are defended and defined by the Reformers such as Martin Luther.  It was these five main points that separated the Reformers from the Roman Catholics.  They were written and taught in response to the Roman Catholic dogma.

As Arminians, we must stand with our Protestant brethren in regard to these points.  We agree and stand with our brethren over them all.  All true Protestant ministry must flow from these points.  While we do hold to our doctrinal distinctives, we hold that these five points are what make us Protestant.  It is the heart of the Reformation.

Written by The Seeking Disciple

03/12/2013 at 10:01 AM

Happy Reformation Day!

Today, October 31, is Reformation Day!  On this day in 1517 Martin Luther took his 95 Thesis and posted them on the church door at Wittenberg in Germany.  The hope of Luther that day was to call the Catholic Church to reform and move away from unbiblical traditions and back to the Bible.  Luther later would develop his theology in regard to justification by faith as opposed to good works to obtain righteousness.

We owe must to the bravery of Martin Luther and his willingness to call the Church to reformation.  In many ways, the Church today still needs to be reformed.  Arminius felt the same way in his day as he called the Reformed Church in his day to embrace the Word of God above the creeds of men.  Arminius felt that many theologians in his day were adhering to creeds and were interpreting Scripture based on the creeds and not sound exegesis.  I agree.  All of us, both Arminians and Calvinists and all in-between, need to embrace the Bible as the inerrant and infallible Word of God and abide by its teachings first and foremost.  Granted that all of us are fallen creatures (Romans 3:23) but we should seek to be faithful to the Word of God despite our own failures and lack of knowledge of all things (2 Timothy 2:15).

Praise God for Reformation Day!

Written by The Seeking Disciple

10/31/2012 at 12:01 AM

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